Professor: Donald Trump is exaggerating his Latino support

You may have heard Donald Trump bragging about his support among Latino voters, but how much Hispanic support does he really have? One ASU professor says Trump is exaggerating.

- You may have heard Donald Trump bragging about his support among Latino voters, but how much Hispanic support does he really have? One ASU professor says Trump is exaggerating.

In 2012, Mitt Romney received just 23% of the Hispanic vote and lost. In 2004, George W. Bush got 44% of the Hispanic vote and won. The ASU professor believes Trump or any Republican Candidate needs 40% of the Hispanic vote to win in the general election.

It's a race to the White House and for the Latino vote. Donald Trump won among conservative Latinos in Nevada, and even in the border town of Laredo, Texas. But how will he do among Latino voters in Arizona.

"I don't like him because all my family is Mexican," said Stephanie Aguayo.

"I think he says too much negative stuff about other people and races," said Janet Hernandez.

ASU Professor Richard Herrera says Trump is only getting a small fraction of the Latino vote.

"It's misleading to suggest he is winning among Latino voters because there are millions of Latino voters. Most of whom are not identifying with the Republican Party," said Herrera.

Most Latinos lean toward the Democratic Party, according to Pew Research 63%. Only 27% identify with the Republican Party.

"For Republicans to be successful they need upwards of 45% of the Latino vote, which is a very high number," said Herrera.

Herrera predicts the conservative Latino vote will follow Nevada with about 10% of all Latino voters in Arizona choosing Trump.

"I just want to go vote for Hillary Clinton, because she represents more the immigrants," said Hernandez.

Herrera says in battleground states such as Florida, Colorado, and Nevada, courting the Latino vote even for Trump is key.

"Voters tend to have fairly strong memories, especially when they feel they've been the subject of attacks, it's going to be very hard to overcome that I think," said Herrera.

Herrera also says the number to look at is Trump's unfavorable ratings. Some polls show 8 in 10 Hispanics have an unfavorable view of Trump.


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