Statistics show spike in officer-involved shootings in Phoenix

- There have been 14 fatal officer involved shootings in Phoenix since the beginning of 2018. That's as many fatal shootings as in all of 2017 in the city, and that has several people alarmed, including officials with the City of Phoenix.

On Wednesday, many council members got an earful from angry citizens who say police shootings have traumatized the community.

"John Wessler, killed by Phoenix PD, April 1, 32nd Street and McDowell," read one person.

"Jacob Uptane, killed by Phoenix Police Department, February 22, 99th Avenue and Broadway," read another person.

"Lazaro Cureil, shot by Phoenix Police Department, 91st Avenue and McDowell," read another person.

It was all an orchestrated message by groups who went before a Phoenix City Council subcommittee Wednesday morning to protest a request by Phoenix Police Chief Jerry Williams. She is asking for approval of $149,000 to pay for a study to look into 14 fatal officer involved shootings in Phoenix so far this year.

"What happened before, during and after to make recommendations, to improve chances of better understanding, why this incidents are happening. Better understanding of frequency, and provide info and training to officers," said Chief Williams.

"This study will not change the culture of violence within the police department," said one person at the meeting. "It will not hold police accountable. Phoenix Police are killing us. This study will not heal trauma. All this will do is provide data on police killings."

"I'm not afraid of the truth, which is why I'm sitting here, asking a third party to come in. Which is why I'm listening to our community members express their frustration. Law enforcement is frustrated too," said Chief Williams.

Ken Crane of the police union spoke at Wednesday's meeting. He was against the study. In fact, Crane said it is just being used as political cover for Chief Williams and others.

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