Death of giant rabbit adds to United Airlines woes

LONDON (AP) - United Airlines is reviewing the handling of a giant rabbit that died after it was shipped across the Atlantic on one of the carrier's flights, adding to a growing list of customer complaints for the U.S. carrier.

Distraught breeder Annette Edwards told The Associated Press by phone Wednesday that a veterinarian checked Simon, a 10-month-old, 3-foot (meter)-long continental rabbit, shortly before the animal was put on a flight from London's Heathrow airport to Chicago's O'Hare, before it was set to continue on to Kansas City. Simon had been purchased by a celebrity whom Edwards did not identify.

"Simon had his vet check just before getting on the plane," she said from Worcestershire in central England. "He was fit as a fiddle."

United spokesman Charles Hobart said the airline is reviewing its handling of the animal. The animal was alive and showed no signs of distress upon landing but died at a pet holding facility at the airport, Hobart said.

"We won't know the cause of death because we offered to perform a necropsy free of charge - that's standard procedure - but the customer didn't want us to perform a necropsy, and we understand," he said.

Hobart said the airline offered compensation to the breeder but would not disclose the amount

United had the second-highest level of animal deaths and injuries of any U.S. airline last year, or 2.11 per 10,000 animals transported, according to U.S. Department of Transportation figures. Only Hawaiian Airlines was worse at 3.99, the result of three deaths among the 7,518 animals it transported.

United reported nine deaths and 14 injuries for a total of 23 incidents, the highest figures for each category among U.S. carriers. The airline transported 109,149 animals last year, second only to Alaska Airlines with 112,281. Alaska reported two deaths and one injury.

United said it works to protect the safety of animals through its PetSafe program, which is staffed 24 hours a day and allows pet owners to track their animals from point of origin to destination.

"Travel can be stressful for animals," Hobart said. "We have a lot of tips and suggestions for customers who decide to ship their pet or (other) animal."

United is already working to repair its image after a passenger who would not give up his seat on an overbooked flight was dragged forcibly from a plane at O'Hare Airport in Chicago.

Airport security officers removed David Dao, a 69-year-old from Kentucky, from the United Express flight. Images of his bloodied face were widely circulated on social media, forcing United CEO Oscar Munoz to apologize.

Two weeks earlier, United was criticized after a gate agent stopped two young girls from boarding a flight because they were wearing leggings. The airline said leggings violate the dress code of the United Pass program, a benefit for employees and their dependents, under which the girls were flying,

The airline said last week that Munoz would not automatically become chairman of the carrier's parent company, United Continental Holdings, next year as originally planned.

Munoz was widely faulted for his early responses to the incident where the passenger was dragged off the plane. He first blamed the passenger but later apologized repeatedly for United's handling of the situation

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David Koenig contributed to this story.

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