Scottsdale budget cuts may put music programs in jeopardy - FOX 10 News | fox10phoenix.com

Scottsdale budget cuts may put music programs in jeopardy

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SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -

Board members from the Scottsdale Unified School District will meet with parents Tuesday night to discuss the upcoming budget cuts that could impact the music program.

Dozens of concerned parents and teachers plan to attend the meting to try to reach the school board before it's too late. They're worried these cuts could hurt the children and their quality of education.

A number of issues have contributed to the $9.8 million deficit, according to the district, including the loss of the M&O override. The tax would've added up to $4.3 million. Residents voted against it last November.

Parents are worried because they're hearing this would mean cuts to special programs, like music, band, physical education, as well as teaching positions.

"Schools are the heart of a community. If you have good schools, your property values are good. You are more attractive to high technology businesses, which is the future," says parent Mary McCarthy.

"We have a budget committee that we've developed, and we're asking that this group of people from the community, from staff, parents, all come together and bring ideas to the table. Everything is on the table right now. We haven't made any decisions. Some recommendations will come forth from the budget committee, and then we will have an opportunity with the governing board," says Carla Partridge Scottsdale Unified School District.

The board is hopeful there will be a budget resolution by April.

On Facebook: www.facebook.com/pages/Respect-Our-Scottsdale-Students/593390197356428?fref=ts

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