Beware what your 'Digital Shadow' says about you - FOX 10 News | fox10phoenix.com

Beware what your 'Digital Shadow' says about you

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To promote a video game called "Watch Dogs," the game's maker has launched a website called Digital Shadow to data-mine your Facebook account.

"The premise is that a hacker is trying to take over a city with only his smartphone," says Paul Wagenseil, a senior security editor for Tom's Guide.

When given permission, Digital Shadow analyzes all the public information about you and your friends available on the social network to create a file detailing everything from your most-used words to your annual salary to your personality.

"Neurotic, depressive, deviant, submissive and volatile," says Wagenseil, who reminds us that your digital shadow report may not reflect the truth. But it does display the way companies might see you with only your public Facebook profile to go on.

Digital Shadow also looks at with whom you interact most often and then places them into categories. It's labeled my little sister as a liability, my friend Alex as a stalker, and I-Hwei and Katherine as pawns who can be used against me.

"It's as if you're the hacker in the game and you're using your Facebook connections to get ahead of the game," Wagenseil says.

But this game's not just predicting some eventual reality. Nearly every digital service already tracks our every digital move and adds it to our ever-growing digital profile.

"They may not realize that it's all being aggregated by Facebook and by Twitter and by Google and used for those companies' own purposes," Wagenseil says. "What you put up there pays for the service. And other people might be buying it."

So while we go about our daily lives handling our business the tech giants of today see us people as a matrix of fluctuating numbers to be sold, traded, and exploited for their profit.

http://digitalshadow.com/

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