The truth about lying - FOX 10 News | fox10phoenix.com

The truth about lying

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

"I did not have sexual relations with that woman." That whopper nearly cost Bill Clinton his presidency. But most of our lies history ignores. And for that, reason humans everywhere will probably go right on telling them.

"From the moment I wake up to the moment I go to bed," a man in Stuyvesant Park told Fox 5, Tuesday.

Americans fib hundreds of millions of times every day, at an estimated 1.67 lies per person, according to a Michigan State study. But to fabricate a lie, our minds and bodies must work harder than they would to tell a truth they already know.

And this is how I came to sit before polygraph examiner, credibility-assessment expert and private investigator Dan Ribacoff.

"There's only one reason to try to beat a polygraph," he said. "You're lying, so that's an instant fail."

For more than two decades, Ribacoff's administered lie-detector tests for police, parole and probation departments, state courts, corporations and individual clients all over the country by monitoring the respiratory, cardio and sweat-gland activity of the person strapped to the chair in front of him.

"When you lie," he said, "you have to stop yourself from telling the truth because as a human being you're programmed to tell the truth."

The questions for my polygraph test proved only minimally invasive.

"Did you circle the number three?" Ribacoff asked me.

"No," I said.

Ice. Cold.

See, I did select the number three. Unfortunately, my blood pressure passed that little secret along to Ribacoff.

"OK," he said, "so, Mac, you're a pretty poor liar."

"There's lots of people lying out there obviously," Truthful Brain CEO Joel Huizenga said.

At Truthful Brain, Huizenga and his team use functional MRIs to monitor brain activity.

"When you lie, you have to use parts of your brain you don't have to use when you're telling the truth," Huizenga said.

Polygraphs fluctuate between 70 and 99 percent accuracy depending on whom you ask and the kind of exam performed. But Huizenga describes his brain scans as nearly perfect.

"There's lots of things that could be improved in this world if we could trust people," he said.

Scanning Bill's brain with a functional MRI while he addressed the nation a little more than 15 years ago might've led the president to tell the truth the first time, avoiding an impeachment process embarrassing for both the president and his country.

But others see no reason to uncover the world's lies, finding no guilt in their own deceit.

"It makes the day more agreeable," that same man in Stuyvesant Park said.

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