Flash Flood Watch
until MON 12:00 AM MST, Northwest Plateau, Lake Havasu and Fort Mohave, Northwest Deserts, Grand Canyon Country, Coconino Plateau, Yavapai County Mountains, Little Colorado River Valley in Coconino County, Little Colorado River Valley in Navajo County, Little Colorado River Valley in Apache County, Western Mogollon Rim, Eastern Mogollon Rim, White Mountains, Northern Gila County, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Yavapai County Valleys and Basins, Oak Creek and Sycamore Canyons, Western Pima County including Ajo/Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Tohono O'odham Nation including Sells, Upper Santa Cruz River and Altar Valleys including Nogales, Tucson Metro Area including Tucson/Green Valley/Marana/Vail, South Central Pinal County including Eloy/Picacho Peak State Park, Southeast Pinal County including Kearny/Mammoth/Oracle, Upper San Pedro River Valley including Sierra Vista/Benson, Eastern Cochise County below 5000 ft including Douglas/Wilcox, Upper Gila River and Aravaipa Valleys including Clifton/Safford, White Mountains of Graham and Greenlee Counties including Hannagan Meadow, Galiuro and Pinaleno Mountains including Mount Graham, Chiricahua Mountains including Chiricahua National Monument, Dragoon/Mule/Huachuca and Santa Rita Mountains including Bisbee/Canelo Hills/Madera Canyon, Santa Catalina and Rincon Mountains including Mount Lemmon/Summerhaven, Baboquivari Mountains including Kitt Peak, Aguila Valley, Northwest Valley, Tonopah Desert, Gila Bend, Buckeye/Avondale, Cave Creek/New River, Deer Valley, Central Phoenix, North Phoenix/Glendale, New River Mesa, Scottsdale/Paradise Valley, Rio Verde/Salt River, East Valley, Fountain Hills/East Mesa, South Mountain/Ahwatukee, Southeast Valley/Queen Creek, Superior, Northwest Pinal County, West Pinal County, Apache Junction/Gold Canyon, Tonto Basin, Mazatzal Mountains, Pinal/Superstition Mountains, Sonoran Desert Natl Monument, San Carlos, Dripping Springs, Globe/Miami, Southeast Gila County

Terrifying dashcam footage of near-miss on highway

A Wisconsin police officer used her squad car to protect two stranded motorists on the highway. Good thing. Moments after she left the vehicle, a truck going 50 miles an hour struck her squad car and came within inches of the officer. The truck finally stopped five feet in front of the couple changing their tire.

When you break down on the roadside, you aren't just dealing with an automotive inconvenience -- you may be dealing with life and death. The chances of a pedestrian surviving being struck by a vehicle are 90 percent at speeds under 20 miles an hour.

But there's almost no chance of survival at 50 miles an hour.

We don't get to pick where our car breaks down, so be prepared. If you break down, AAA recommends that you:

Never stand behind or directly in front of your vehicle.

Turn your hazards on at night or during bad weather

Raise your vehicle's hood.

Immediately call for help once you are a safe distance from the roadway.

If your vehicle is inoperable and you can safely get to a safer location, do so.

If it is unsafe to get out of the vehicle, remain inside and wait for a law enforcement officer or roadside assistance.