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New technology helps those with color blindness see colors

Millions of Americans are color blind and 5% to 10% of the population have some sort of color deficiency.

Chris Wright is one of them. "Dressing myself and putting clothes on. Thankfully I have a wife that's there that can kinda help out with coloring. Even my shirt that I'm wearing now, I couldn't tell if it's pink or blue and thankfully she leads me the right way."

But that's changing, thanks to a new technology.

"I didn't see any of these before," said Chris to his doctor.

The new technology is in the form of purple lensed glasses, like these by O2 AMP. By blocking a certain wavelength in the color spectrum, they allow the wearer to see the color everyone else sees.

Although usually genetic, some people can acquire color blindness later in life. Color blindness can limit opportunities for those born with it and be a career changer for those who develop it.

"We have meat inspectors, we have botanists, we have lots of artists who enjoy it. There's lots of engineers in terms of wiring. There's pharmaceutical folks who have to tell the difference between the colors of drugs coming through," said Dr. Mark Changizi, the O2 Amp creator.

Thanks to this new technology, people like Chris will be able to see the world in ALL its glory.