Flash Flood Watch
until MON 12:00 AM MST, Northwest Plateau, Lake Havasu and Fort Mohave, Northwest Deserts, Grand Canyon Country, Coconino Plateau, Yavapai County Mountains, Little Colorado River Valley in Coconino County, Little Colorado River Valley in Navajo County, Little Colorado River Valley in Apache County, Western Mogollon Rim, Eastern Mogollon Rim, White Mountains, Northern Gila County, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Yavapai County Valleys and Basins, Oak Creek and Sycamore Canyons, Western Pima County including Ajo/Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Tohono O'odham Nation including Sells, Upper Santa Cruz River and Altar Valleys including Nogales, Tucson Metro Area including Tucson/Green Valley/Marana/Vail, South Central Pinal County including Eloy/Picacho Peak State Park, Southeast Pinal County including Kearny/Mammoth/Oracle, Upper San Pedro River Valley including Sierra Vista/Benson, Eastern Cochise County below 5000 ft including Douglas/Wilcox, Upper Gila River and Aravaipa Valleys including Clifton/Safford, White Mountains of Graham and Greenlee Counties including Hannagan Meadow, Galiuro and Pinaleno Mountains including Mount Graham, Chiricahua Mountains including Chiricahua National Monument, Dragoon/Mule/Huachuca and Santa Rita Mountains including Bisbee/Canelo Hills/Madera Canyon, Santa Catalina and Rincon Mountains including Mount Lemmon/Summerhaven, Baboquivari Mountains including Kitt Peak, Aguila Valley, Northwest Valley, Tonopah Desert, Gila Bend, Buckeye/Avondale, Cave Creek/New River, Deer Valley, Central Phoenix, North Phoenix/Glendale, New River Mesa, Scottsdale/Paradise Valley, Rio Verde/Salt River, East Valley, Fountain Hills/East Mesa, South Mountain/Ahwatukee, Southeast Valley/Queen Creek, Superior, Northwest Pinal County, West Pinal County, Apache Junction/Gold Canyon, Tonto Basin, Mazatzal Mountains, Pinal/Superstition Mountains, Sonoran Desert Natl Monument, San Carlos, Dripping Springs, Globe/Miami, Southeast Gila County

Forecast: Falling iguanas in South Florida

The National Weather Service usually sticks to atmospheric weather events, but the agency made a special exception and expanded forecasting criteria to include things falling from above.

The National Weather Service in Miami issued an alert about the possibility for falling iguanas Jan. 21.

"This isn't something we usually forecast, but don't be surprised if you see iguanas falling from the trees tonight as lows drop into the 30s and 40s," NWS Miami wrote on Twitter.

It's not the first time South Floridians have witnessed seemingly-dead iguanas fall from the trees during a cold snap. 

Iguanas become stunned in cold conditions and sometimes appear dead. However, as some learned in January 2018 in West Palm Beach, the giant green lizards are just waiting - perfectly still - for the warm weather to return.

According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, green iguanas are an invasive species and are not native to the Sunshine State.

They have caused damage to infrastructure, including seawalls and sidewalks, according to agencies in charge of managing the hundreds of miles of canals that channel water throughout South Florida

RELATED: Pesky iguanas cost West Palm Beach $1.8 million in emergency repairs

A prolonged cold spell in 2010 reduced the number of green iguanas in South Florida, but the population has exploded since then.

They’ve become infamous for nuisance pool pooping and munching on ornamental landscapes, giving rise to a new industry: iguana-removal experts.

PREVIOUS: Iguana nightmare: Massive iguana population turns Florida into 'Jurassic Park'

This story was reported from Tampa, Florida.