Flood Watch
from FRI 11:00 AM MST until SAT 11:00 PM MST, Coconino Plateau, Yavapai County Mountains, Little Colorado River Valley in Coconino County, Little Colorado River Valley in Navajo County, Little Colorado River Valley in Apache County, Western Mogollon Rim, Eastern Mogollon Rim, White Mountains, Northern Gila County, Yavapai County Valleys and Basins, Oak Creek and Sycamore Canyons, Western Pima County including Ajo/Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Tohono O'odham Nation including Sells, Upper Santa Cruz River and Altar Valleys including Nogales, Tucson Metro Area including Tucson/Green Valley/Marana/Vail, South Central Pinal County including Eloy/Picacho Peak State Park, Southeast Pinal County including Kearny/Mammoth/Oracle, Upper San Pedro River Valley including Sierra Vista/Benson, Eastern Cochise County below 5000 ft including Douglas/Wilcox, Upper Gila River and Aravaipa Valleys including Clifton/Safford, White Mountains of Graham and Greenlee Counties including Hannagan Meadow, Galiuro and Pinaleno Mountains including Mount Graham, Chiricahua Mountains including Chiricahua National Monument, Dragoon/Mule/Huachuca and Santa Rita Mountains including Bisbee/Canelo Hills/Madera Canyon, Santa Catalina and Rincon Mountains including Mount Lemmon/Summerhaven, Baboquivari Mountains including Kitt Peak, Kofa, Central La Paz, Aguila Valley, Southeast Yuma County, Gila River Valley, Northwest Valley, Tonopah Desert, Gila Bend, Buckeye/Avondale, Cave Creek/New River, Deer Valley, Central Phoenix, North Phoenix/Glendale, New River Mesa, Scottsdale/Paradise Valley, Rio Verde/Salt River, East Valley, Fountain Hills/East Mesa, South Mountain/Ahwatukee, Southeast Valley/Queen Creek, Superior, Northwest Pinal County, West Pinal County, Apache Junction/Gold Canyon, Tonto Basin, Mazatzal Mountains, Pinal/Superstition Mountains, Sonoran Desert Natl Monument, San Carlos, Dripping Springs, Globe/Miami, Southeast Gila County

Learn about a new language: Pro-Tactile ASL

Language is always evolving, and this new form of communicating emerged in the early 2000s. Deaf-blind Americans created a language that uses humans' first language -- touch. No sight or sound needed.

Pro-Tactile American Sign Language is not widely known, but it's changing the way deaf-blind people communicate with each other. Previously they've relied on Braille, fingerspelling, or using an interpreter

Pro-Tactile borrows from ASL, but also uses the perceiver's hands and body to communicate the message. You would use your hands to sign on their arm, or incorporate the perceiver's limb into the sign to make it with you.

Interpreting this new language then depends on context, much like the spoken word. There are even signals that are equivalent to "uh-huhs" or nods, like a confirming tap on the hand to let them know that you're following along and understand.

Humans instinctively communicate through touch -- think of an encouraging pat on the back or a mother soothing a child. Pro-Tactile ASL proves that there's so much more to tell and opens up an incredible way of sharing within the deaf-blind community.