Flash Flood Watch
until MON 12:00 AM MST, Grand Canyon Country, Coconino Plateau, Yavapai County Mountains, Little Colorado River Valley in Coconino County, Little Colorado River Valley in Navajo County, Little Colorado River Valley in Apache County, Western Mogollon Rim, Eastern Mogollon Rim, White Mountains, Northern Gila County, Yavapai County Valleys and Basins, Oak Creek and Sycamore Canyons, Western Pima County including Ajo/Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Tohono O'odham Nation including Sells, Upper Santa Cruz River and Altar Valleys including Nogales, Tucson Metro Area including Tucson/Green Valley/Marana/Vail, South Central Pinal County including Eloy/Picacho Peak State Park, Southeast Pinal County including Kearny/Mammoth/Oracle, Upper San Pedro River Valley including Sierra Vista/Benson, Eastern Cochise County below 5000 ft including Douglas/Wilcox, Upper Gila River and Aravaipa Valleys including Clifton/Safford, White Mountains of Graham and Greenlee Counties including Hannagan Meadow, Galiuro and Pinaleno Mountains including Mount Graham, Chiricahua Mountains including Chiricahua National Monument, Dragoon/Mule/Huachuca and Santa Rita Mountains including Bisbee/Canelo Hills/Madera Canyon, Santa Catalina and Rincon Mountains including Mount Lemmon/Summerhaven, Baboquivari Mountains including Kitt Peak, Aguila Valley, Northwest Valley, Tonopah Desert, Gila Bend, Buckeye/Avondale, Cave Creek/New River, Deer Valley, Central Phoenix, North Phoenix/Glendale, New River Mesa, Scottsdale/Paradise Valley, Rio Verde/Salt River, East Valley, Fountain Hills/East Mesa, South Mountain/Ahwatukee, Southeast Valley/Queen Creek, Superior, Northwest Pinal County, West Pinal County, Apache Junction/Gold Canyon, Tonto Basin, Mazatzal Mountains, Pinal/Superstition Mountains, Sonoran Desert Natl Monument, San Carlos, Dripping Springs, Globe/Miami, Southeast Gila County

UArizona researchers urge 3-week shutdown, mask order to contain COVID-19 surge

The coronavirus outbreak’s current surge will present Arizona with a hospital crisis that could become a disaster unless the state takes steps such as ordering a three-week stay-home shutdown and implementing a statewide mask mandate, university researchers said.

Without such steps, “it would be akin to facing a major forest fire without evacuation orders,” members of the COVID Modeling Team at the University of Arizona said in a letter on Nov. 27 to the state Department of Health Services. The team has tracked the outbreak since last spring.

Other steps recommended by the team include providing economic aid to affected small businesses and families and preventing evictions and foreclosures.

READ THE LETTER HERE

Many local governments have imposed mask mandates since Gov. Doug Ducey last summer lifted a prohibition on such orders. The local mandates cover an estimated 90% of the state’s population but enforcement is lax or non-existent in some places. A statewide measure, the modeling team wrote, “ensures consistency and strengthens compliance.”

RELATED: Four Arizona mayors call on Gov. Ducey for statewide mask mandate

Ducey early in the outbreak shut down schools, many businesses and other establishments but then relaxed the restrictions, leading to a virus surge that made Arizona a national hot spot last summer. He later reinstituted some restrictions.

Now, as in many states, cases and hospitalizations in Arizona have again surged in the wake of school and business reopenings and public weariness with COVID-19 restrictions.

Arizona State University researchers on Nov. 19 projected that hospitals in the state will exceed their capacities unless steps are taken.

A patient is taken from an ambulance to the emergency room of a hospital in the Navajo Nation town of Tuba City during the 57-hour curfew, imposed to try to stop the spread of the Covid-19 virus through the Navajo Nation, in Arizona on May 24, 2020.

While not again imposing new broad mandates, Ducey has taken steps to help hospitals and repeatedly urged Arizonans to wear masks and take other precautions against COVID-19 spread.

State Sen. Martin Quezada, D-Phoenix, endorsed the modeling team’s recommendations. “State leaders should have political courage and protect public health by enacting them now,” he said on Twitter. “These aren’t unreasonable requests.”

Arizona Dept. of Health Services responds

The state Department of Health Services responded to FOX 10 about the letter on Saturday, stating:

"ADHS continues to review modeling forecasts presented by the state universities. We are on high alert and closely monitoring real-time data on transmission and health care capacity, as well as models that have been shared."

The department has also said that mitigation measures have already been implemented, mentioning local mask mandates, bar closures, 50% capacity for restaurants and theaters, 25% capacity for gyms, mask mandates in schools and a prohibition on large public events.

"We are in regular communication with hospitals, healthcare providers and our local health departments," officials wrote in a statement. "ADHS continues to monitor this situation closely and work with our hospital partners and may take additional steps as the situation evolves." 

The DHS director, Dr. Cara Christ, on Friday said in a video that Arizona faces significant spread and the holidays “have the potential to further increase spread.”

“All of the metrics continue heading in the wrong direction,” she said. “To put it simply, people are letting down their guard.”

Coronavirus in Arizona: Latest case numbers

The state on Saturday reported reported 4,136 additional known COVID-19 cases and 36 more deaths, increasing the state’s totals to 322,774 cases and 6,624 deaths.

Hospitalizations related to COVID-19 continue to increase, reaching 2,383 as of Friday, including 553 patients in beds in intensive care units, according to the state’s dashboard.

Seven-day rolling averages of daily new cases, daily deaths and COVID-19 testing positivity in Arizona all increased in the past two weeks, according to data from The COVID Tracking Project and Johns Hopkins University.

The new cases daily average rose from 2,116 on Nov. 13 to 3,849 on Friday while the daily deaths average rose from 21.1 to 23 and the positivity rate average went from 14.7% to 19.3%.

The number of infections is thought to be far higher than reported because many people have not been tested, and studies suggest people can be infected with the virus without feeling sick.

For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some — especially older adults and people with existing health problems — it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, and death.

Continued Coverage

Phoenix man shares story of COVID-19 battle on TikTok

Dan Weissman says since he started to document his COVID-19 battle on social media, he has gained many followers, and even some words of kindness from others whom he had never met.

Arizona uses federal COVID-19 money to reduce state spending

The state’s coronavirus dashboard reported 4,314 additional cases and 20 deaths, increasing the state’s totals to 318,638 cases and 6,588 deaths.

City of Tempe offering residents, employees impacted by COVID-19 rental and mortgage assistance

If you're a resident or employee in Tempe, you may qualify for rental or mortgage assistance if you've faced financial hardship due to COVID-19.

Arizona hospitals stop some transfers of out-of-state patients amid COVID-19 surge

The Arizona department of health says virus-related hospitalizations had reached 2,217 as of Nov. 24, including 531 in intensive care units.