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Hunter's Moon to glow in October sky: Everything you need to know

FOX NEWS - Skywatchers are in for an experience that's literally out of this world: a full moon, known as the Hunter's Moon, will take place on Wednesday.

Simply put, it's 'the full Moon after the Harvest Moon," NASA says in a blog post.

The most recent Harvest Moon -- another full moon -- took place Sept. 24.

"According to the Farmer's Almanac, with the leaves falling and the deer fattened, it is time to hunt," the space agency says. "Since the harvesters have reaped the fields, hunters can easily see the animals that have come out to glean (and the foxes that have come out to prey on them)."

When will the full moon take place?

NASA says the full moon will appear at 12:45 p.m. ET on Wednesday.

Don't worry, though, if you fail to set an alarm to catch the action.

"The Moon will appear full for about three days centered around this time, from Tuesday morning through Thursday night," NASA says.

Anything else I should know?

It may be tough to actually see the full moon in daylight hours -- but there are two times you can watch it at near-total brightness.

On the East Coast, the moon will be 99.5 percent lit up at around 6:30 p.m. Wednesday and 7 p.m. Thursday, Travel + Leisure reports.

The publication suggests heading "somewhere reasonably high" to check out to eastern horizon.

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